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growing concern about the bombing of rebel-held areas by gaddafi's forces, there are voices in the u.s. and europe calling for the rebels to be armed to directly. it sounds simple, but history offers plenty of cautionary tales. in a moment, we will hear whether senator john mccain thinks it is a good idea. >> what i am calling for is a greater access for the libyan opposition forces for weaponry. >> there is no guarantee that by helping these people, you necessarily bring about a more democratic outcome or more desirable outcome. >> the question is, what kind of arms with a supply? whom would supply them? britain session -- britain's special forces may have suffered a setback last week in libya. but the momentum is still building in the west for military intervention of some kind, including perhaps arm the rebels. in libya, repeated bombing by government warplanes around the rebel-held oil town of ras lanuf marks colonel gaddafi's drive in his country. opposition forces are determined, but still lack a clear organization or command structure. the worst violence was reported near tripol
of an amnesty, a dialogue, and an invitation to a u.s. fact-finding mission, even a chance for a free press. for his hard-core supporters, it was a family day out, and it did not matter what he said. the libyans to do not like things the way they are, who do not want civil war, might listen and wonder whether the risks of taking on the regime are worth it. the colonel's leadership style is eccentric, but he is hitting back hard and slowing the rebellion against his rule. that was something they could not do in egypt or tunisia. jeremy bowen, bbc news, tripoli. >> an international effort has begun to repatriate tens of thousands of foreigners, most of them egyptian, who have been massing on libya's border with tunisia. britain and france have sent several of their plans. the largest british warship is heading for libyan coastal waters. they have rescued 85,000 in the past week. we have this report from the border. >> the struggle for liberation in the arab world has led to this. men fighting for a seat on a bus, desperate to escape from libya, pleading to simply be allowed to go home. 85,000
and france and the u.s. want gaddafi to go and face trial for war crimes and for libyans to work towards choosing a new and more open system of government. libyan television shows casualty victims injured in plane strikes. but it cannot be clairefied. >> the last official figure that we've. the rebels in their vehicles return. they are -- they have now returned. the rebels on one set -- side of ben jawad and they are using a large amount of rockets, firing them into and over the town of the gaddafi forces, and the gaddafi forces are replying with ar tilly. >> all right, nick. thank you for that update. >> let's speak to our world affairs correspondent in the capital now. as you know we've got this london conference about to get under way this afternoon. what, if any, has been the reaction to the conference in tripoli? >> well, colonel gaddafi has sent out a letter, strangely unreported here, to the american congress and european parolments and various other people appealing to them to stop what he calls the crusader aggression. the letter says civilians here have been killed by the crusa
new american security. we will talk with the u.s. import export bank on president obama's trip to latin america and what it means for u.s. trade. after that, we will discuss the implementation of the health care law. ♪ host: as president obama cut his latin america trip short, and returns to washington, the washington post reports that key nato allies have tentatively agreed to take the lead role. but none have officially signed on. other news out of the middle east -- the yemen president pledging to step down when your early has not satisfied opponents. help from saudi arabia is likely to be rejected. we will keep you updated throughout today's "washington journal." the nation's health-care law turned 1 years old today. we have a separate line set aside for health care .ractitioner i the new health care law -- it says, a loose federation of left-leaning groups have gathered to peddle the virtues of health care reform. it is like we have to world. the article says that in other words, the future is very uncertain right now. i would not give more than a 50- 50 chance that all
strike on a key oil port. investigators in germany believe the fatal gun attack on two u.s. airmen in frankfurt airport was politically motivated. and and ecb interest rate hike is on the horizon as the bank frets over mounting inflation. ♪ >> france and britain say there will support a no-fly zone over libya if the situation there gets worse. the french foreign ministry says the two countries plan to do everything they can to increase pressure on moammar gaddafi. the libyan leader once more airstrikes on the rebels thursday morning. witnesses say warplanes bombed an oil port. the rebels have appealed for outside help, asking for u.n.- backed airstrikes to end the conflict. >> in the battle zone town, rebels are burying the dead. thousands turned out to join the funeral procession. there are mercenaries hired by gaddafi. they're preparing for new attacks on their town, a strategic seaport with key oil facilities, after recent air strikes, a ground attack by gaddafi's troops appears imminent. >> we're ready to face gaddafi's men. our scouts are telling us they are headed this way.
with jeremy bowen in london. >> the u.s. jets returning to their base in italy. the decision to use air power against colonel gadhafi in libya was taken quickly, so quickly that they are still sorting out the politics behind it. if that is one reason for the london conference, assembling ministers and diplomats from 40 countries, and the arab league and the african union to back u.n. resolutions. though thertheir enthusiasm for military action varies. the mandate to protect civilians also means taking sides in a civil war. >> we made the right choice, that was to draw a line in the desert sand to halt the murderous advance of gaddafi's forces. no one has yet to explain when or how that commitment ends. the conference also said -- started the process toward more legitimacy. this is the closest of rebels have to a political leadership and would like more help on the ground, too. >> the americans said they would consider arming the rebels. is that something you would like? >> you can see that they are fighting with machine guns, etc. >> the u.s., france, and britain are talking about army the re
with the battle -- the bbc middle east. it starts with jeremy bowen in london. >> the u.s. jets returning to their base in italy. the decision to use air power against colonel gadhafi in libya was taken quickly, so quickly that they are still sorting out the politics behind it. if that is one reason for the london conference, assembling ministers and diplomats from 40 countries, and the arab league and the african union to back u.n. resolutions. though thertheir enthusiasm for military action varies. the mandate to protect civilians also means taking sides in a civil war. >> we made the right choice, that was to draw a line in the desert sand to halt the murderous advance of gaddafi's forces. no one has yet to explain when or how that commitment ends. the conference also said -- started the process toward more legitimacy. this is the closest of rebels have to a political leadership and would like more help on the ground, too. >> the americans said they would consider arming the rebels. is that something you would like? >> you can see that they are fighting with machine guns, etc. >> the u
general wesley clark. after that i discussion on the state of u.s. public education. >> i am a numbers guy. >> as a visual op-ed columnist for "in york times," charlie blow uses trawls and brett -- charts and graphs i do not decide that will talk about a subject and look for the data. i search for that that person see if there is something interesting and that agrees with an opinion that i have or sometimes what surprises me and what surprised by readers. >> sunday night it 8:00 on c- span. >> no reporter's roundtable on the role of nato in libya. from "washington journal," this is 55 minutes. scully is with "national journal" and we have missy ryan -- pentagon reporter. how significant is it that nato will step up and take the lead? guest: it is an important step but not everything the obama administration wanted. what they have done it is often rise nato countries to enforce the no-fly zone but that is only the first part of the u.n. security council resolution. what the nato countries did not do is authorize the full mandate, which is all necessary means required to protect civilians.
the demand of the u.s. security council 1970, that it stop the violence against the libyan people. his forces have attacked peaceful protesters and are now preparing for a violent assault on a city a million people that have a history dating back to 0.5000 years. then become -- have begun airstrikes on what we expect to be air, land, and sea forces. every home will be searched and there will be no mercy and no petition on. if we want any sense of what that might mean, we only have to see in what happened to so we zawia. human rights watchers have catalogued the appalling human rights atrocities that are being committed. mr. speaker, that is the demonstrable need. we said there must be clear which of the people of libya and the wider region for international action. it was the people of libya through the national council who were the first to call for protection through a no-fly zone. i would say this. it really has been remarkable how arab leaders have come forward and condemned the actions of the dot the's government. in recent days, i have spoken with leaders of saudi arabia, qatar, the uni
. >> there will be participation in the diplomatic effort. this is the last signal. the u.s., u.k. and france have set the conditions. after the summit, i think that we will launch the military intervention. >> reports from libya said forces loyal to colonel khadafy continue to attack rebel forces despite the cease-fire. we traveled to the east of the country. we have a report from benghazi. >> what began as a rebellion now sounds more like a war. this area has been attacked from the sea, land and air. it is a graphic illustration of why a no-fly zone is needed. over the last hour or so we have been listening to the sound of what appears to be a pretty brutal battle between the two sides. we can hear the sound of rockets and artillery landing. we believe that the front line has now edged slightly closer to benghazi. it is difficult to know what the tactics of colonel khadafy are, but they seem to be applying as much pressure as they can upon the rebels before the no-fly zone is put into action. >> it is impossible to know how many have died here. we were shown the bodies of two fighters killed here to
of terrorism after the u.s. drops 40 missiles and tomahawk cruise missiles targets sites. >> steve: joining us from the site where that plane was shot down yesterday, rick, do we know, whose plane was that and who did shoot it down? >> reporter: we can confirm now who that plane belonged to. we believe we're the only network have located the fighter jet that shot down out of the skies of benghazi, yesterday morning. behind me is the engine of that jet, the wings, char pieces remains and the photographer was rolling on the jet that was hit by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into that area on the southern edge of the city and what we're hearing from locals is that they believe the pilot, who was an opposition fighter as opposed to gaddafi directed this wounded jet into this area that's unpopulated and old adoption home. and the pilot put the jet here and we know that the pilot had a family and ejected far too late and we found the harness from his ejecting seat out of the seat itself and to clear up confusion we found a tail section of the jet pointed with the old royal jet and the new flag for t
will not be defeated. further air strikes have been taking place in the u.s. secretary of state has been suggested in that aids for khaddafi may be looking for a way out. >> angry and characteristically defiant, colonel gaddafi appeared to be in the compound targeted by an allied missile on the first night. for the supporters with him and watching, he said that he would keep on fighting against libyan rebels and the international forces. he said that he is not afraid. he said that he is the fiat, his home is here, and he is here. colonel gaddafi has pledged that there will be no surrender. the revolution for imperialism came on another night when there was fire around the capital. here bringing traffic into the streets rather than heading for cover. from hillary clinton comes the suggestion that gaddafi might be looking for an exit strategy. >> i am not aware of his personally reaching out but i do know of people allegedly on his behalf reaching out. this is a very dynamic situation. >> diplomatic strategies are being pursued to convince the libyan leader to take another course. these pictures pro
at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. while this committee does not have oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants, we do have to consider how events such as those at fukushima affected the ability of our nation's nuclear freedom, 104 reactors, to supply electricity. of course, these 104 reactors currently account for about 20% of the electricity that we use and what the future of nuclear energy will be as part of our nation's energy banks. events at fukushima are changing by the our. they are serious, and we are watching those events unfold on the other side of the world. our knowledge at best is incomplete. as we look forward to these experts and forming a committee on what they see at the plant, how would impact our nation must existing fleet of reactors, and answer questions the committee members might have. before i introduce our two -- our first panel, we have four witnesses, two on this first panel and two on the second trip before i introduced the panel, let me call on senator murkowski for comment. >> let me welcome those who are presenting today. i appreciate the time is
the equivalent of the pentagon. in the war against iraq, the u.s. war was committed from a headquarters in florida. they have a communications established with the commanders in the region in on the ground. host: what does it mean for the united states? guest: the and that is this is trying to hand off responsibility for the mission as quickly as possible. they wanted to do the things that only the united states could do, provide rapid command- and-control structure to get the operation going rapidly and effectively. and then to use the u.s. military firepower to destroy and dismantle gaddafi's command- and-control systems and particularly his surface to air missile capability. that is very important because no one -- everyone wants to minimize the danger to pilots enforcing the no-fly zone, and taking out those missile sites becomes very important to enable that. but that is the initial phase. that is starting to wind down if you look at the number of targets, the number of sites already it, i think this operation has been designed so that the u.s. could do the thing that the unit -- t
on the security council. president obama said today military options are still on the table. there are signs the u.s. might go along with a resolution if there is a consensus. we are seeing how people feel about foreign intervention. >> all over benghazi, there are posters say no foreign intervention is needed to help the people rid themselves of colonel gaddafi. if there clear about that. after several days of attacking protestors strongholds, several towns in the west, the town of ras lanuf, the rebels thought they had captured that themselves, only now are they beginning to change their mind. would you accept foreign help now? >> yes. the no-fly zone would be very welcome. the surgical bombings -- where he has his supporters. some other bases where he has his troops, we do not mind surgical bombing there. we did not mind a no-fly zone over libya because he is using his aircraft to kill people. they have no cover for that. we can match them on the ground, but in the skies, we have no power. we would welcome very much a no flying zone over libya. but no foreign troops on the ground. a no-fly zone w
says it will be hosting a summit in london next week. progress on the u.s. mandate intervention in libya. the u.s. military said there is no indication that coalition air strikes resulted in any civilian casualties. wednesday night, sites again or targeted in the capital of tripoli. bobby gaddafi -- gaddafi's tanks in israel were hit. schelling's have resumed. >> a propaganda war is also being waged in libya. brandishing, a presenter on libyan state television pledged to give his last breath for libyan leader gaddafi. state television also broadcast images of gaddafi's supporters staging demonstrations and gaddafi himself making a brief public appearance for the first time in days. speaking from his compound, gaddafi pledged victo, denouncinghat he called the unjustified aggression of crusader nations. although the united nations- backed strike had forced his troops to retreat, battles are still waiting on the ground. rebels and regime forces are still fighting for control in eastern libya, where thehave been engaged in a standoff for days. the u.s. president says intervention w
the rebellion in the east of libya. president obama at the authorizes u.s. military to repacked create thousands of migrants. >> i have approved the use of u.s. military aircraft to help move egyptians who have fled to the tunisian border to get back home to egypt. >> still the keep coming out of libya. 200,000 have crossed into egypt and niger. we follow one group who got lucky. welcome to th"bbc world news". coming up later. the egyptian prime minister has resigned. agents ruling military council has appointed a former transport minister. britain opens of classified papers to reveal extra terrestrial goings on. two forces loyal to colonel gaddafi are clashing. there have been fresh attacks on the airport. in the more than two weeks since the start of the uprising, the u.n. estimates up to 1000 people may have been killed. the international criminal court has announced an investigation into allegations of crimes against humanity committed by colonel gaddafi and his inner circle. our first report is from john simpson. from eastern libya. after yesterday's victorious battle, the rebel volunteers
. the u.s. is making it increasingly clear that having been in the lead of the libyan mission, it wants to step back now. the latest reports from the rebel-held town talk of pro gaddafi snipers filing at the hospital. -- firing at the hospital. >> please, please bomb his forces until they stop. i have to be impartial because i am a medical person, but five, six consecutive days that have been killing with tanks and artillery, bombing us. please stop him. >> other residents say they have attacked their base. the rebels remain for now force of on certain potential, but it is clear the situation is increasingly turning into a test of the coalition possibility to influence events on the ground. -- the coalition's ability to influence events on the ground. >> with me now it is ben brown. there has been much activity around you today? >> the rebels are still trying to push west, about an hour-and- a-half from here, trying to take advantage of the coalition air strikes and military action which they are seeing day after day, night after night. the rebels are making heavy delegate of getting an
. >> welcome. as fierce fighting continues in libya, president obama has said he has not ruled out supplying u.s. weapons to opposition figures in the country. he also says he believes colonel gaddafi was losing control of his country would ultimately step down. speaking in a series of interviews on american news networks, president obama called on the leadership around colonel gaddafi to make it clear that he had to go. >> the circle around gaddafi understands that the noose is tightening, that their days are probably numbered. and they're going to have to think through what their next steps are. but as i have been very clear about throughout, there's certain things they can do that will send the signal that he's ready to go. until that time, we're going to keep on applying pressure and hopefully he's going to be getting the message soon. >> if gaddafi ends up in a villa someplace in zimbabwe with no war crimes trial, is that ok with you? >> well, you know, that's not going to be my decision alone. i will tell you, though, that the first step is for gaddafi to send a signal that he understands
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
. >> thank you. britain says it will be hosting a summit in london next week. progress on the u.s. mandate intervention in libya. the u.s. military said there is no indication that coalition air strikes resulted in any civilian casualties. wednesday night, sites again or targeted in the capital of tripoli. bobby gaddafi -- gaddafi's tanks in israel were hit. schelling's have resumed. >> a propaganda war is also being waged in libya. brandishing, a presenter on libyan state television pledged to give his last breath for libyan leader gaddafi. state television also broadcast images of gaddafi's supporters staging demonstrations and gaddafi himself making a brief public appearance for the first time in days. speaking from his compound, gaddafi pledged victory, denouncing what he called the unjustified aggression of crusader nations. although the united nations- backed strike had forced his troops to retreat, battles are still waiting on the ground. rebels and regime forces are still fighting for controleastee been engaged in a standoff for days. the u.s. president says intervention would not
him. >> they have identified him as aaron thomas. u.s. marshals arrested him at his home friday afternoon. >> i did not know what was going on. >> the neighbors were shocked to learn that he faced sex assault, burglary, and weapons charges in connection with 17 attacks, including 12 rapes in virginia, maryland, connecticut, and rhode island. investigators say dna evidence was crucial in solving these cases. about 12 cases have been linked by dna to the same offender. >> acting on a tip, the fbi put him under surveillance a couple days ago. >> we confirmed that thomas was the east coast. this. and among the 12 cases, an 18- year-old woman raped in these woods. residents who live across the street are grateful. >> that is wonderful that our technology can do this. it is amazing. >> this is the sketch that the police have been circulating. they have not released a mug shot of thomas yet. they're hoping the victims will identify him in a lineup. he is doing court in connecticut on monday. richard reeve, abc 7 news. >>> we are on storm watch. heavy rains are on the way. the rest of t
to step down. but in an exclusive interview, libyan's colonel gaddafi came out fighting. the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. said that he was delusional. >> it was colonel gaddafi's first interview since this crisis started. he agreed to see bbc news and the sunday times. he said that the u.n.sanction resolutions against libyan were illegitima illegitimate. and asked if he would leave the country. [laughter] as if anyone would leave their home land, he said. >> mr. gaddafi, you have been known as the leader, and for years. and plenty of people in this country would say that the biggest obstacle of change for them and libya is you. >> he said that his presence actually instigated change for the people. >> in recent years you have had important western leaders like tony blair coming here. and now there are western leers leaders saying you should go. >> of course it's betrayal, they have no morals, besides if they want me to step down, what do i step down from? i am not a monarch or king. >> but you can step down even if you don't have a formal title. >> it's honor, he said, nothing to
are very divided. the russians and chinese are not keen it. neither is the u.s. defense secretary. >> the u.n. security council resolution provides no authorization for the use of armed force. there is no unanimity among nato for the use of armed force. >> refugees are crossing the border from libya to tunisia. >> let's turn to the thousands of people fleeing the unrest in libya. the situation at the border has reached quite -- there is struggling to cope with the influx of people. our correspondent is at the point between the two countries. >> we want to leave, they shout. these people are stranded in no- man's land, out of libya, but not yet safely into tunisia. this border crossing point has been overwhelmed by a tide of humanity. more than 70,000 people so far and counting. the boston majority of both migrant workers from countries like egypt -- the majority of my co-workers from countries like egypt. -- migrant workers from countries like egypt. many are exhausted and sick. they had been traveling for days to get here. >> there has to be a massive effort, not just by one country, but a
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
marine in the theater has talked about the main problems, that only with u.s. direct involvement and substantial financial infusions of money -- the budget for a spans greater than the entire afghan gdp. when we leave, how will the afghan government pay for it? from his perspective, on the ground, almost entirely by u.s. supervision and u.s. financing. >> first of all, that does not give adequate credit to our afghan partners. marja, which was liberated less than a year ago, which took 4200 u.s. marines when we started, which is down now to 1600, they have been able to hold the district community council election. this is right after their great debate. it was neat stuff. this was them running this. there are 10 schools open now in marja. there were zero under the taliban. these are afghans teaching in the schools, not us. we may have to rebuild the schools, working to repair irrigation systems, the market's the use to sell exclusively illegal narcotics and weapons and explosives -- there are now about 15 markets that sell household goods, food, and clothing. these are the afghan
just a few weeks ago. >> i was told that i would be assassinated. >> the gunman kills two u.s. airmen on a bus in frankfurt. hello. it was the day that gaddafi loyalists seemed to be fighting back against the libyan uprisings in earnest, but now, the libyan leader's opponents look to be back in control. they bit off an attack by the libyan army unit with vastly superior weaponry, but at one point, they did have the upper hand. medics say at least 14 people died in the fighting. "bbc world news" editor reports from nearby. >> news on the attack reached us in the early morning. defenders started preparing for the possibility that colonel gaddafi's forces would roll straight on and try to capture this place. they were excited and nervous. defenders here have a few ancient russian tanks which they rolled out. older and less effective than the tanks the gaddafi forces are apparently using. many of the volunteers here are deserters from colonel gaddafi's army. their position could be particularly dangerous. but the mood is defiant. >> we have decided there is only one way for us to go, and
the obama administration is not moving forward asking for a no-fly zone from the u.s. congress or the un security council. there have been democrats and republicans pushing the obama administration to consider a no- fly zone. senator john kerry called for one, which follows lieberman and mccain. pretty much the entire spectrum has been pushing president obama to do more. i think secretary clinton and secretary gates have been trying to throw a little cold water on the idea, pointing out the risk s and consequences of such a decision. >> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has said that all options are on the table when it comes to dealing with libya and dealing with colonel gaddafi. what is your sense of what that means? is it rhetoric? is their intent behind that? >> one would hope there's intent behind that. both the united states and european capitals have said that gaddafi must go now and they have imposed these sanctions. so far, there's been no real action. we have our navy off the coast of libya right now, but with no apparent course of taking action. we've heard about the ris
for debate, not action. u.s. secretary of state has insisted that this be a u.n., not american initiative. protesters are keeping a low profile in at the capitol. but the protesters still seem determined to fight. >> only 30 miles away from the wyatt, the military success makes it even more dangerous -- from zawiya, the military success makes it even more dangerous for protesters. they believe in former is are everywhere. yet another protester joined us. they have never been on facebook before, which is now blocked. they do not have weapons, unlike the rebels in zawiya. but many have died, too, killed by the regime. >> jeremy. >> do you think because of the force that he has used -- >> no, and he is not finished. i will never speak any words with -- i am not arab. >> what is your gut feeling, like your feeling inside about how this is killing two and? >> we do not want this to go on. >> so, how do you beat him? >> how we will be? with faith. that is the only way. we don't have guns or modules or anything. but we have faith. we have the faith to be free people. >> how do you sustain this?
you can't ask for unmanned drones from the u.s. what else would you need, particularly from the iaea? >> i believe we have been asking for help from the iea -- iaea and from the united states. we will require and we will ask for assistance as needed. we will not hesitate to ask for help if we feel it is necessary. >> in terms of the humanitarian situation, what is your assessment of how that is progressing? how are you getting essentials supplies for those in such desperate need, bearing in mind that weather conditions and the nuclear situation on going? >> i believe the earthquake itself, magnitude 9.0, unprecedented. many of the roads, land communications are destroyed. our immediate response was sending in almost 80,000 troops and rescue forces to rescue people. we succeeded in rescuing 26,000 people. now, as you say, the issue of how to support and released those displaced, -- and rel ieve those displaced, that is a concern for us. we set up headquarters at the ministerial level to address this issue quickly. we are using our forces to send in necessary material. take an example
's speech, i am joined by richard murphy, it was the former u.s. ambassador to syria. think ford joining the program. -- thank you for joining the program. the president said there would be impending reform, but did not give the reform the wanted to see at a few weeks later he was out of power. that is not the case the caseassad of syria. -- that is not the case with president assad of syria. am i think you are right, he is a person who has popularity. he is counting on both to carry him through. while his spokesperson a few days ago, monday i believe, said there would be a committee formed to study a series of reforms including lifting the emergency law, obviously, thus far the committee has said this is not the moment, given that the government is facing a most serious challenge that it has had since president assad became president in 2000. that is the protests and the bloodshed and government crackdowns continue, is there a tipping point or even that regime says enough is enough, we have to give some? >> i think it is possible they will come up with some reforms. he repeated that tod
. defining the american dream of. we begin a special series examining those who have called the u.s. home. >> welcome to our viewers on a pbs in america. and in libya, state tv reports the new allied air strikes tonight even as anti-government rebels closed in on what could be an important symbolic win. they have been moving steadily west. moving from than gauzy, they are now in control -- moving from benghazi, the biggest win would be the capture of sirte. >> is taking the fight to colonel gaddafi parks and birthplace -- gaddafi's birthplace. a victory here would have huge symbolic value. if the libyan leader cannot defend his home town, how long can he defend his regime mark? rebels said these were some of his supporters, mercenaries sent to kill. they were defeated by poorly armed volunteers. we found rebel fighters racing to the front-line sending a message. it the weeks ago, a gesture like this would have gotten him killed. along the way, we met this band of brothers and cousins and extended family have said they were ready to fight and die together so that their children could be fr
changed for the u.s., do you think? >> what changed was the arab league to vote over the weekend. it was clear that there was going to be arab involvement in this move towards airstrikes which has been led by britain and france. america and president obama decided that the conditions were right to adopt a much more muscular approach at the security council this week. this probably would not have happened without america's vigorous support. crucially, of course, we have these five abstentions. 10 votes in favor and five against led by china and russia. interestingly of course, in that group is germany. germany, the biggest country in the european union, has very serious feelings about whether the air strikes are possible or whether they will lead to a potential escalation or a regional conflict. >> any of the ambassador's apart from the germans talk about military actions about strategic air strikes? >> no, what we had is a lot of rhetoric and a lot of show of unity. there is a tension. clearly no one is sure how this military action is going to proceed from here on in. president
of the operation. france, britain, in the u.s. have taken the lead so far, but nato has yet to agree whether the alliance should have a leading role in the mission. the meetings for talks have been scheduled for all of the key international players in london next week. ministers will be hoping to have resolved the issue of control by then. bbc news. >> earlier, i spoke to the former u.s. ambassador to the united nations under president bill clinton, and the arab league, the african union, and others that are not fully committed to air strikes, and president obama said the international community is fully behind the action in libya. >> first, you have to remember that the international community did pass this through the union, so there is that international credibility. as this goes on longer than people expect, this is the first time they have done this. it happened very quickly. it is a healthy debate going on. it is not clear it will remain an unanimous block to do it, but i think with the american leadership, you will see it largely remaining intact. >> i would like to ask you another qu
of migrant workers have fled libya. the u.s., britain and tunisia are providing planes. egypt is providing ships. the u.k. in the last hour, the opposition labour party has won the election in the north of england, taking 61% of the vote. parts of the governing coalition, the liberal democrats, the war's second in the general election last year, where six -- who were second in the general election last year, 6th.were >> the labor party has replaced a man convicted of using parliamentary expenses. a paratrooper, an officer in the british army, last year's serving in afghanistan is the new m p year in south and york sure -- here in south yorkshire earning. anything less would of been embarrassing. it has been a very bad night for the liberal democrats. they have slipped from second place in the general election last year to 6th, barely mastering 1000 votes for their candidate. it has been embarrassing for him personally and humiliating for the liberal democrats the will see this as the first sign of what they can expect in some parts of the u.k. as the cup that the government, the coalition
for joining us. >> thank you. >> jamie: what is on the table actually for the u.s.? >> well, we could, declare a no-fly zone but that is complicated, because, while the u.s. has aircraft, in all the nate tows countries, italy and britain and germany we cannot use this aircraft unless we have permission from the host country and that is not likely to come. they've already said they will not give permission unless the u.n. or nato-wide agrees to that and that will not happen. >> jamie: going it alone -- >> we'd be in it alone and, a no fly zone is not just to say, nobody fly over lybia, what a no-fly zone would require is that u.s. aircraft, probably based on carriers, would go in to lybia and would bomb lybia and bomb the air defense system of lybia and fly 24/7 over lybia and that is a major commitment. and, also sets the precedent, what about the next revolution that you will see? because you will see more of these. and, so, the question is, could we do it? yes, we could but it is at a great cost and secondly, joe, jamie is the question, should we? now, right now, so far the libyan rebels are
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
say. and keep it there for a long time. >> the u.s. economy? >> almost no impact whatsoever. stock markets go up and down. they always overreact. i would not pay any attention to them. one way or the other. >> a common view. >> the only thing that makes sense is that it drops the most, but if you took seriously their estimate of the cost to japan, to claim that the wealth loss was almost $1 trillion. that is clearly not realistic at all. the drop has been too much. one reason is that the market has been then. there is not that much confidence in it. in europe, there has also been a drop in the stock market, but the same story. the u.s. stock market has been pretty resilient. nothing -- nothing much has really happened. maybe it is unfortunate, but japan is simply not a big market for the united states. we do not export much to anybody anymore. in particular we do not export a lot to japan. we worry about japan, it is too soon about a big interruption to our electronic and automobiles supplies. i do not expect that to happen. i do not think that what goes on in japan will have a big
that more people had died in the villa, at what point does the u.s. say that now we are going to do something? how many people have to die? how many threats to their need to be to our energy needs? >> jake, i would simply say -- and remind you -- when you say that this has been a couple of weeks already, that is a remarkably short period of time from the time when colonel gaddafi was perceived to be, and was, in control of his country to the point where the international community is imposing substantial and punishing sanctions on him and his regime. the international community, speaking with one voice, calling for him to step down and cease the violence against his own people. we are talking about a matter of days and weeks that this has transpired within. i am aware of the ongoing violence. as the president just did with australia, we are again calling on the libyan regime to stoppin the in humane, brutal, unacceptable assaults on its own people. and for colonel gaddafi to step aside, as he has lost legitimacy in the eyes of his people and the world. >> i was not -- i was talking
that if something like this happens in the u.s. that you'll have the ability, and i understand apparently from some of the testimony, what i've read is apparently you guys are in charge. in terms of implementing, you're the go-to people now? is that accurate in terms of dictating who does what and who's in charge? an ongoing plan that's developing? >> in response to nuclear power plant, the inside of the facility is regulated by nuclear regulatory commission. outside of the plant is actually the local and state responders with fema supporting them. if you have a scenario that resulted in release, the most important thing to occur is successfully evacuate people away from that plant. those the type of things that the exercise plans work on. these are the things that local and state officials train against, and our role of the federal government, to support them we additional resources required in the event of an evacuations had to take place. those are the thing, and i think from a standpoint of your question, if you would like senators to have our staff, reach out with the state and give your staff
and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think o
. we are ok. no problem. >> in the east, the air campaign had its first loss, a u.s. air force eagle jetfighter crashed in rebel territory. the alliance says it wasn't shot down but suffered mechanical failure. its two crewmen have been rescued. east of tripoli, the fight for control of the city goes on. rebel forces were enjoying a moment of celebration. then this. how quickly the moment turned to panic and retreat. >> the condition is so serious. since last night, they have no lights, electricity in the hospital. they're working with generators. yesterday it was disaster because more than 22 missiles. >> 1973 pact, no one to die. >> no one died last night. the libyan government insists they will swear many civilians have been killed and wounded by allied strikes t might well be true. we have asked them for evidence. so far, they have not provided it. bbc news, tripoli. >> the american admiral leading the international operation to enforce the no-fly zone has said gaddafi loyalists are still attacking civilians and coalitions are considering options to stop that. on a diplomatic lev
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